Man orders a TV via Amazon, gets a Military grade assault rifle

Seth Horvitz ordered a Westinghouse 39-inch LCD for about $320 from a third-party electronics seller on Amazon and was shocked to see what he got a military-grade assault rifle.

He received a delivery via UPS ground, a HUGE oblong box that arrived at this door step.

When I saw some metal parts inside the box, I thought, ‘Maybe this is a TV stand or mount or something,’” Horvitz said in a phone interview with Wired.

“When I realized it was an assault rifle, it was pure shock and disbelief.”

Horvitz immediately contacted D.C. police to inform them about the situation, they came in a confiscated the box which contained a semi-automatic Sig Sauer 716 patrol rifle. The police informed Horvitz that the gun was illegal in the District of Columbia.

“They took the gun away, gave me a report number, and said, ‘I hope you get your TV, or I hope you get your money back,’” said Horvitz.

An invoice found inside the box, Horvitz said, listed the sender as online gun retailer Gunbuyer.com. The invoice, for $1,590 was addressed to Independence Gun Shop, a gun store in Duncansville, Pennsylvania.

Jason Sidney, the gun shop owner was surprised about the incident and said that this happened for the first time, he went on saying that they order guns on a regular basis, the person who orders the guns has to go through an approved federal firearms licensed shop, both the licenses are verified, the shipper and the receiver, and then they ship the gun to the approved ATF FFL holder.

When asked if he mistakenly received a TV: “That would be nice.”

“When I contacted the seller about it, they denied knowing anything about it,” Horvitz said. “They acted surprised — ‘I’d never owned a gun in my life.’ Amazon shut down their account.”

A Review rejected by Amazon

It seems that this is a UPS mixup, it has two address labels stuck one above another, A reverse lookup of the tracking number on the package shows that the package originated in Daytona Beach, Florida, on Aug. 3. The package then hopped to Jacksonville, Florida; Baltimore, Maryland; and Landover, Maryland; before finally arriving at Horvitz’s doorstep on Aug. 7.

“I wanted something that would be good as a computer monitor, that would be good for movies, too,” he said.

The DNetWorks Team